Top 12 Tips for a Safer Holiday Home

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Our world is full of risk at every turn—from perilous jobs to dangerous driving conditions. That’s why we all love to get back to our homes and not worry about everyday safety hazards. It’s great to feel comfortable and safe at home, but is it as safe as it can be?

 

Your home should be your haven: the place where you will be protected from harm. It should be a top priority, and yet every year 1200 people or more visit the emergency room during the holiday months due to accidents and unintended injuries sustained from hidden dangers around the home.

 

With a sharp eye and preventive action you can reduce the chances of lurking safety dangers for everyone who visits your home.

 

The Top 12 Home Safety Tips

 

  1. GOOD LIGHTING— Adequate lighting reduces the risk of tripping and falling both inside and outside your home. This is especially important in winters when days are shorter. Critical areas that need to be illuminated are the stairs, outdoors, and foyers. Make sure your street number is well lit and visible from the street to aid first responders find your home. The fix: Make sure adequate wattage is utilized and long-life bulbs and motion detectors are in place.

 

  1. ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS?— Electrical issues, like a flickering light or a dead outlet, can be mild annoyances that actually signal serious dangers. If not addressed promptly, a faulty electrical system can result in house fires and shocks. The fix: If you’re experiencing any problems with your electricity, contact a professional right away. In your daily life, make sure electrical cords are not frayed or pierced and extension cords are securely connected. Do not run too many cords to a single outlet. Unplug small appliances, space heaters, and power tools when not in use.

 

  1. DO ROUTINE CLEANING— Not maintaining your appliances leads to a greater chance of accidental home fires. The fix: Do simple tasks regularly like cleaning grease off your stovetop, emptying the lint trap on your dryer, and keeping your chimney clean and clear.

 

  1. SMOKE AND GAS DETECTORS— Every home needs functional warning devices that detect smoke and gases. The fix: When purchasing smoke alarms, make sure they also detect carbon monoxide, a deadly gas that is especially dangerous because it is colorless and odorless. Replace the batteries every six months—or whenever you change your clocks. Create an emergency evacuation plan, build a preparedness kit, and practice regular safety drills with your family to ensure awareness of procedures.

 

  1. SECURE YOUR HOME— Many homes now have the latest technological advancements but still rely on locks and hardware from decades ago to keep you safe from intruders. The fix: Do an audit of all entry points to your home—doors and windows and screens. If any do not have secure screens, locks, and deadbolts, have them installed. For those entry points that do already have door knobs, handles, and locks, make sure that they are in good working condition.

 

  1. WHEN YOU ARE AWAY— We all enjoy long weekends and out-of-town vacations, but unfortunately that leaves your home vulnerable to intruders. The fix: Create the illusion that someone may still be there. Leave a TV or stereo on in the room where a burglar would most likely break in. Have neighbor pick up mail and the daily paper. Turn down phone ringers, keep blinds drawn, and don’t leave unsecured valuables in the home even if you think they are well-hidden. Never hide keys around the home or garden, and don’t leave notes on the door that suggest you are out of town.

 

  1. HOUSEHOLD REPAIRS— Even if you are an expert and know your way around electrical, plumbing, car or other household repairs, proceed with caution. A poor repair could be a recipe for disaster. The fix: Call a professional or ask me for a referral from our trusted sources.

 

  1. VEHICLE CAUTION— Remember that there is danger even before you drive on the street. If you are backing your car up, watch out for children and pets on the sidewalk and road. The fix: Be cautious and proceed slowly when driving vehicles in or out of your driveway. If your driveway does not have good visibility in both directions, walk down and look in both directions before you get in your car.

 

  1. MAKE IT SAFE FOR VISITORS— If you are hosting friends and family, consider what additional safety challenges they may face. The fix: Put yourself in the shoes of a small child and look for low, hard edges, sharp objects, easy-to-open cabinets with chemicals and cleaning agents. Look for falling and tripping hazards that may fell seniors.

 

  1. BRACE YOURSELF— Heavy objects are rarely braced in the home. Appliances, artwork, televisions, and aquariums present real hazards if they are knocked down by a person or a natural disaster. The fix: Strap and brace heavy objects and use security hardware for large artwork.

 

  1. UNCOVER HIDDEN DANGERS— If your home was built before the late seventies, there’s likely lead in the paint under the top coats on your walls and windows, and there might be traces in the varnish used on many hardwood floors. In addition, asbestos often can be found in insulation and “popcorn” ceiling textures. The fix: Hire a licensed contractor to test for possible contaminants and remove them safely, especially prior to a remodel.

 

  1. MOTHER NATURE— Your homeowners insurance will cover you in many instances, but did you know that you may not be insured against natural disasters like earthquakes, floods, tornadoes, and hurricanes? They typically require an additional policy. The fix: Contact your insurance agent to make sure you have adequate replacement coverage as home values escalate and coverage amounts can stay static. Discuss costs for adding disaster policies for the natural disaster most likely to hit your area. Finally, having a disaster and communication plan can minimize the risks.

 

Safety Dangers to Kids You May Not Think About

 

Do you have small children who live with you? Even if you don’t, with the holiday season rapidly approaching, your home may welcome friends with young children and older family members. This makes now the ideal time to survey home your home for potential safety problems.

 

OPEN WATER

Did you know that as little as an inch of water can be a major hazard? A pail of water in the yard, large puddles from a storm, even a washing machine can induce a small child to trip or fall into and become at risk. The fix: Watch for open ice chests and other standing water, and don’t leave toilet seats open.

 

SMALL BATTERIES

Button-sized lithium batteries power small electronic devices, including remote controls, watches, musical greeting cards, and ornaments. When accidently swallowed, they can get stuck in the esophagus and generate an electrical current that can cause severe chemical burns and tissue damage. The fix: Only let small children play with mechnical devices and toys under supervision, and make sure to put these items away when not in use.

 

WINDOWS AND STAIRS

Every year, more than 5,000 kids end up in the emergency room after tumbling out of a window. Combat that by installing window guards or window stops so kids can’t fall out. Stairs are another potential hazard for youngsters with less-than-perfect balance. The fix: Baby gates can prevent young kids from venturing up or down. Steps should always have firm footing and be clear of objects as even older people can slip and fall or trip on items left on the stairs.

 

FAMILY PETS

Cats can scratch a child not used to playing with finicky felines. The family dog may be big and loving but can outweigh a child by five times. Children can be easily knocked down, nipped, or even bitten by a dog not used to the activity of small children. The fix: Monitor play activity and make sure your pet is not getting anxious or annoyed.

 

CORDS

Babies can be strangled by cords on blinds and shades. The fix: Excessive cords of all types should be removed or secured down. Always keep cribs away from windows with loose cords.

 

Now’s the Time

With the upcoming holidays at hand, now is the perfect time to survey your home and address potential safety hazards to yourselves, your family, and your friends. It doesn’t take long, most fixes are very inexpensive and simple to do, and your efforts will pay dividends in peace of mind for years to come.

 

If you would like our advice on how to make your home safer and need a list of trusted sources for home repairs, please contact us today. It’s our business to ensure that your home is safe and secure for your family.

Chris Lee and RustysTeam | 205-233-5183| clee@realtysouth.com | http://www.chriswlee.com

The Home Equity Playbook

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What is Home Equity?

Home equity seems to be a very simple calculation — the total amount of mortgages owed subtracted from the current market value of a home. Here is a simple example:

 

Current Home Market Value         $325,000

Existing Mortgage                          $225,000

Homeowner Equity                         $100,000

 

One side of the equation is well defined, and it is found on the monthly mortgage statement, the loan balance. The other side is less obvious — the current market value of the property.

 

As a homeowner, your down payment purchases your initial equity, and your monthly (or additional) principal payments increase your equity. In strong real estate markets and in-demand locations, equity can increase quite rapidly as the property value increases, but the inverse can also happen — too much available inventory and market down-cycles can lead to falling home values and a reduction in homeowner equity.

 

It can be difficult to put an accurate value on something that you have emotional and monetary vesting in. It is safe to say that most people think their home is worth more than then it is.

 

Homeowners can make savvy assessments about their home’s current market value by following the sales of similar properties in the neighborhood, but should stay away from websites such as Zillow and Trulia, which provide inaccurate and outdated estimates. The most accurate measurement requires a comparative market analysis from a real estate professional or having the home professionally appraised. But, the bottom line — your home is worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it.

 

Creating Value is in Your Hands

Maintaining the condition of a home is vitally important to retaining and increasing value. Homes are judged against their peers: how they compare to similar homes in the neighborhood. Another way to retain value is to not over upgrade, since it is rare to ever recoup the money spent if you exceed neighborhood value. Keep up the landscaping and do the little things to add curb appeal.

 

Putting Home Equity to Work

Home equity represents the largest single asset of millions of people, and because it represents so much of an individual’s net worth, it must be treated with respect. Home equity is not a liquid asset until a property is sold, or it is borrowed against.

 

There are two types of loans that tap into homeowner equity as collateral.

 

Home Equity Loans

 

Many home equity plans set a fixed period during which the person can borrow money, such as 10 years. At the end of this “draw period,” the person may be allowed to renew the credit line. If the plan does not allow renewals, the homeowner will not be able to borrow additional money once the period has ended. Some plans may call for payment in full of any outstanding balance at the end of the period. Others may allow repayment over a fixed period, for example, of 10 years.

 

A home equity loan, sometimes called a second mortgage, usually has a fixed rate and a set time to pay it back, generally with equal monthly payments.

 

Home Equity Line of Credit

 

A home equity line of credit is similar to a credit card. The lender sets a maximum amount you can borrow, and you can draw money as you need it, though many home equity lines of credit require an initial draw. The interest rate varies daily, and is usually prime plus a set number, but the required payment is usually interest only. Once the loan has been paid down, the payment is reduced, and it can be paid off and initiated as many times as a homeowner requires.

 

How Much Equity can be Accessed?

Since the financial institution is lending money and using a home as collateral, they will not lend 100% of the home’s equity. The bank does not want to take the risk that if the house price drops, they would be carrying a loan for more than its market value. Therefore, most banks will allow a qualified homeowner to borrow approximately 80% of their equity.

 

It’s Important to Use Your Home Equity Wisely

Because it is likely the biggest asset most people have, losing your home equity is hard to overcome. It must be used in prudent ways, and the payments against the loan must be affordable. Using equity money to make the loan payment is only acceptable for a short-term solution.

 

There are number of good reasons to use money from a home equity loan… and some really bad ones. First, let’s cover smart uses.

 

  1. Invest in Your Home

The best way to use the money is create more equity in the home. Among the very best returns on your investment (ROI) include kitchen and bathroom remodels, adding square footage or an extra bath, enhancing curb appeal and repairing/keeping the existing structure sound. Making prudent investments in your home is a wonderful win-win: you enjoy the upgrades and the repairs can add value to the home.

 

  1. Invest in your Children’s Education

Using your home equity to finance a child’s higher education may be the greatest payoff of all. Not only is the rate much lower than a student loan, it is an investment in the child’s future.

 

  1. Supplement Retirement Needs

Older homeowners spent their working lives paying down their mortgage. At retirement, when monthly income is reduced, a home equity loan could pay for a dream vacation or an unexpected major expense.

 

  1. Augment the Impending Sale of a Home

If you’re planning to sell soon, a home equity line of credit may be the best way to finance improvements, and you can pay it off entirely when you sell. Investing wisely on upgrades and repairs may even reap a profit on your investment.

 

Here are some examples of some not very wise choices.

 

Adding luxury amenities like a swimming pool, a hot spa, lavish landscaping, expensive appliances and exotic countertops and flooring rarely pay off.

 

Purchasing a car or boat or most any personal luxury items is a poor use of the funds, since these items quickly depreciate in value.

 

Also stay away from using money on risk-heavy investments. Financing stock purchases, start-up businesses and paying routine bills is not financially smart. If you cannot afford to purchase those items with available funds, using equity from your home means they should not be in your budget.

 

You should treat a home equity loan as an investment and not as extra cash when making financial decisions. If your intended use of the money doesn’t pay you back in some way, it’s not the best use of your valuable equity.

 

We Are Happy to Assist You

If you would like an assessment of the market value of your home and the current equity you can access, give us a call for a comparative market analysis (205-233-5183). or simply visit www.tuscaloosahomevalue.com

Begin your home search here

 

 

Don’t Get Burned – Get a Home Inspection to Save Money on Your Next Purchase

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Okay, you made one of the most important decisions in your life: you’re buying a home! You found your ideal home. It’s in your desired neighborhood, close to everything you love, you dig its design and feel, and you’re ready to finalize the deal.

But, whoa … wait a minute! Buying a home isn’t like buying a toaster. If you discover something’s wrong with your new home, you can’t return it for a refund or an even exchange. You’re stuck with your buying decision. Purchasing a home is an important investment and should be treated as such. Therefore, before finalizing anything, your “ideal” home needs an inspection to protect you from throwing your hard-earned money into a money pit.

A home inspection is a professional visual examination of the home’s roof, plumbing, heating and cooling system, electrical systems, and foundation.

There are really two types of home of inspections. There is a general home inspection and a specialized inspection. Most general inspections cost between $267 and $370. The cost of the specialized inspection varies from type to type. If the inspector recommends a specialized inspection, take that advice because buying a home is the single most important investment you’ll make and you want extra assurance that you’re making a wise investment.

By having your prospective new home inspected, you can:

  • Negotiate with the home seller and get the home sale-ready at no cost to you
  • Prevent your insurance rates from rising
  • Opt-out of the purchase before you make a costly mistake
  • Save money in the short and long run

How Much Money Can a Home Inspection Save You?

A home inspection helps to find potential expenses beyond the sales price, which puts homebuyers in a powerful position for negotiation. If there are any issues discovered during the home inspection, buyers can stipulate that the sellers either repair them before closing or help cover the costs in some other way. If the sellers do not want to front the money to complete the repairs, buyers could negotiate a drop in the overall sales price of the home!

Perhaps even more importantly, a home inspection buys you peace of mind. Your first days and months in a new home will set the tone for your life there, and you don’t want to taint that time with worries about hidden problems and potential money pits.

To help you understand how much money a home inspection can save you, here are some numbers from HomeAdvisor to drive the point home … so to speak.

Roof – Roofing problems are one of the most common issues found by home inspections. Roof repair can range between $316 and $1046, but to replace a roof entirely can cost between $4,660 and $8,950.

Plumbing – Don’t underestimate the plumbing. Small leaks can cause damage that costs between $1,041 and $3,488 to repair. Your home inspector will look for visible problems with the plumbing such as leaky faucets, water stains around sinks and the shower, and noisy pipes. Stains on walls, ceilings, and warped floors show plumbing problems.

Heating and Cooling – Ensuring the home’s heating and cooling system is working properly is very important. Your home inspector will make you aware of any problems with the existing system and let know you whether the system is past its prime and needs replacing. You don’t want to throw down $3,919 to replace an aged furnace. Nor do you want to spend $5,238 replacing an ill-working air conditioner. Replacing and repairing a water heater gets pricey too. Wouldn’t you rather use your savings for a vacation?

Electrical Systems – When thinking of the electrical system, no problem is better than even a small problem. Electrical problems might seem small, but they can blossom into thousand-dollar catastrophes. Make sure your home inspector examines the electric meter, wires, circuit breaker, switches, and the GCFI outlets and electrical outlets.

Foundation – If your home inspector sees that the house is sinking, that means water is seeping into the foundation; cracks in walls, sticking windows, and sagging floor also indicate foundational problems. The foundation is so important that if the general inspection report shows foundation problems, lenders will not lend money on the home until those issues are solved. Foundation repairs can reach as high as $5,880 to repair.

As you can see, a small investment of a few hundred dollars for a general home inspection can save you tons of money and future headaches. To save even more money, you might consider investing in a specialized home inspection as well. A specialized inspection gets down to the nitty-gritty of all the trouble spots the general home inspection might have located.

How Much Money Can a Specialized Inspection Save You?

A general home inspection can trigger a need for a specialized inspection because the general home inspector spotted something off about the roof, sewer system, the heating and cooling system, and the foundation. If humidity is high where you’re buying your home, a pest inspection is recommended. Usually, a pest inspection will check for mold as well as pests. Most homebuyers have a Radon test done to ensure air quality.

Roof – Roof specialists examine the chimney and the flashing surrounding it. They also look at the level of wear and tear of the roof. They can tell you how long the roof will last before a new one is needed. They’ll inspect the downspouts and gutters. The average cost of a roof inspection is about $223. Most roof inspections will cost between $121 and $324.

Sewer System – Making sure your sewer system has no problems should happen before the closing because what might look like a small problem can turn into a large problem in the future. If any issues pop up, you can negotiate with the seller about needed repairs or replacements before closing. Cost of inspection will vary; on the low side, it might cost you around $95, and on the high side, it might cost you $790. Compare these numbers to repairing a septic tank, which can cost, on average, $1,435 (though it could reach as high as $4,459), and you can see that the cost of an inspection is worth it when you catch the problem before you buy.

Heating and Cooling System – A HVAC specialist will check the ducts for blockage and for consistent maintenance of the unit. The repairs needed might be small or they might be big, but this small investment will save you headaches and lots of money down the road.

Foundation – A foundation specialist will pinpoint the exact problem with the foundation. The specialist will look at the grade or slope of the home. The ground should slope away from the home in all directions a half inch per foot. Most homeowners have spent between $1,763 and $5,880 to repair their foundation. And the average cost to re-slope a lawn is at $1,705. Most homeowners paid between $933 and $2,558 to re-slope their lawn.

Pest Inspection – Termites eat a home’s wood structure from inside out and can cause thousands of dollars worth of damage to your home. Other pests can turn your dream home into a nightmare. Depending on the humidity of where you live, you should a pest/termite inspection every two years or so. You can start with your potential new home. Most inspections are extensive and cost between $109 and $281. The good news is that most pest management company will guarantee the past inspection if bugs show up.

Radon Test – Radon is a naturally occurring invisible odorless gas that is the second leading cause of cancer. A radon test is a good test to have done as a good habit. The cost of radon test is low and its cost varies from state to state. Here’s more information about Radon.

Steps You Can Take to Save Money Using a Home Inspection

To help yourself save with a home inspection, you will need to:

Attend the inspection – Attending the inspection is important because it’s an opportunity for you to ask questions.

Check utilities – Checking utilities let’s know the energy efficiency of your potential home.

Hire a Qualified Home Inspector – We can recommend bona-fide home inspectors to you. You can compare our recommendation with all inspectors who belong to the American Society of Home Inspectors. While the decision of who you work with is always yours, we can educate you so that you make a wise homebuying decision.

 

 

2017 Housing Design Trends

Who hasn’t tried to predict the future? Whether it be predicting the economy, gas prices, or even how your favorite team will perform this season, we have all done it. So when it comes to the interior design of your home, why not take a look at what is making a comeback, and what the “paint color of the year” is predicted to be?

For years granite has been the go to for all of your countertop upgrades. You may be surprised to learn that granite is no longer the favored material when consumers go to upgrade their kitchen. Quartz has become the new favorite of consumers in this market. Citing many factors including, durability, resistance to scratches, color variety, and resemblance of marble, quartz is now the “in” trend.

quartz

Have you ever heard the saying “history repeats itself”? Well that is also true when it comes to subway tile. Remember that faded green subway tile in your grandparents bathroom when you were a child? Well guess what? According to Realtor Magazine, subway tile is a classic, and is coming back strong in kitchens and bathroom remodels. The preferred color scheme consumers are using are lighter colors especially off whites.

subway-tile

Lastly, if you are considering repainting a room in your home to improve market value for the next year poised taupe is the way to go. If you are like me you are wondering what that looks like exactly. Poised taupe is best described as a brownish-gray hue color. So there you have it, your predicted color of the year for 2017.

poised-taupe

Housing Updates… Where to Spend the Money

Who doesn’t love a gourmet kitchen or steam shower? These fancy amenities and setups are highly desired in any home, in any market. When choosing to spend money upgrading a home what makes more sense, replacing that old shingle roof with a metal one, or changing out the old shower with a new steam shower. One thing that potential buyers take for granted when buying a home is already expecting that the roof does not leak and that the electrical systems are in good working order. No matter how fancy your kitchen, how big your bathroom, or how spacious your living room, if the exterior of the house is not well taken care of the buyers will not be able to see past it.

Now to the good part. If your roof, siding, electrical systems, and other basic facets of your home are in good order where should you spend the money and start first? I’m glad you asked. Take a look at the article linked below from HGTV.com about which upgrades can bring the greatest resale value to a home.kitchen

Which Home Improvements Pay Off?

Open Sunday July 26 2-4! 5420 COURTNEY AVENUE TUSCALOOSA AL 35406

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Come out Sunday to see this great home in The Townes of North River!

Open Sunday July 26th 2015 from 2-4pm

This home is the lowest price per square foot alley home in the ever popular Townes of North River. You will appreciate this home’s unique floor plan the moment you step into the formal entry. This 3100 square foot, four bedroom three and a half bath home has many features not found in other homes in the neighborhood including built in speakers on both front and back porches and the main living space. There is also a bedroom over the garage that would be a great playroom, and a teen suite or man cave which is also wired with speakers. The back patio with shade sail canopy and built in gas grill is the perfect spot for your next barbecue. Tell your Realtor you want to see this home today!

For more information go to www.chriswlee.com/100632 or call Chris Lee with RealtySouth at 205-233-5183.

Price:                           $414,900

Bedrooms:                  4

Baths:                           3.5

Sq Footage:                 3100 +/-


Chris Lee   –  RealtySouth  –  Tuscaloosa, AL           205-233-5183          www.chriswlee.com      clee@realtysouth.com

Coming Soon! 20970 Old Jasper Road Northport AL 35475

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All Brick 3 Bedroom 2 Bath home with Basement and 13+/- Acres

Are you looking for a home with acreage?  This home has it all!  Three Bedrooms, two full baths and an open floor plan with lots of natural light! The home has been completely rewired and all of the doors and windows have been replaced.   This home features a full front porch and a back deck looking over the property.   The full basement provides lots of storage and workshop space.  There is also a storage building/workshop and a 2 car carport with storage on the property.

For more information please call Chris Lee with RealtySouth at 205-233-5183  or email me at clee@realtysouth.com  

Price:                           $199,900

Bedrooms:                  3

Baths:                           2

Sq Footage:                 1400 +/- (main area) 1400 +/-  Basment

Chris Lee   –  RealtySouth  –  Tuscaloosa, AL           205-233-5183          www.chriswlee.com      clee@realtysouth.com

New Listing! 6412 Championship Drive, Tuscaloosa AL 35405

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Amazing Home on Tall Pines Golf Course!

This spacious open floor plan with lots of natural light and high ceilings, arched doors, two decks with great views of the 15th tee on Tall Pines golf course. The main level has a formal dining room, great room, kitchen and breakfast area, master bedroom suite, two additional bedrooms and a second bath. The walkout basement features a large open rec. room that could be used as a downstairs living room, a guest bedroom and a third bath. The unfinished portion of the basement has a storage/workshop area with full lighting and is perfect for hobbies or bad weather. It is easy to join the Tall Pines Country Club with golf, swimming and a clubhouse.

HOA covers all yard maintenance (mowing front and back yard including trimming shrubs), storage area for an RV or boat, sprinkler system (water for the sprinkler system, maintenance and repair) painting the trim on exterior of the home (decks are not included in trim) and common areas.

MLS# 102542 (Click here for more details)

Price:                           $299,900

Bedrooms:                   4

Baths:                            3

Sq Footage:                 3046 +/-

Other Features:            Sits on Hole 15 of Tall Pines Golf Course, Walk out Basement, Master on Main level, Workshop/Extra Storage, 2 decks (one upper and one lower), Very low maintenance!

Chris Lee   –  RealtySouth  –  Tuscaloosa, AL           205-233-5183          www.chriswlee.com      clee@realtysouth.com

Live at the Plaza in Downtown Tuscaloosa Continued every Friday through July

Live music events at Govt. Plaza in Downtown Tuscaloosa are continued every Friday in July. There will be no charge for those who choose to attend, and coolers of beer or bottles of wine will be welcome at the shows Calderone described as “a fun, downtown, family-friendly event.”

Live at the Plaza Tuscaloosa  Chris Lee RealtySouth

The Event will be from 6 p.m.-8 p.m.

July 10 – Tekneek

July 17 – Steel City Jug Slammers

July 24 – The Doctors and The Lawyers

July 31 – TBA

For Directions Click Here

Chris Lee   –  RealtySouth  –  Tuscaloosa, AL           205-233-5183          www.chriswlee.com      clee@realtysouth.com

Price Reduced! 1426 MAXWELL CIRCLE TUSCALOOSA, AL 35405

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 LOCATION!!  Close to Schools, Restaurants and Grocery Stores

This home has great curb appeal and is within walking distance of Englewood elementary school and grocery stores. This home has an open floor plan, with a large master suite and walk in closets. The kitchen has lots of counter and cabinet space and walks out onto a covered patio and a spacious fenced back yard. Other features include a large pantry, security system and a fireplace in the family room.

MLS# 100182

Price:                           $139,900

Bedrooms:                   3

Baths:                             2

Sq Footage:                 1271+/-

Other Features:            Close to Englewood Elementary, Taylorville Primary School, Hillcrest High and Middle Schools.  This property is also very close to local restaurants and grocery stores.

Chris Lee   –  RealtySouth  –  Tuscaloosa, AL           205-233-5183          www.chriswlee.com      clee@realtysouth.com